quirkilicious:

Cowabunga by Quirkilicious
Let’s all just pretend the Bay movie didn’t happen like how Avatar fans pretend the Shmyayayalalan movie didn’t happen. ;D

lomonette:

sweatyscrotum:

I’m not like other girls!XD

image

I only have guy friends. I mean all girls do is start drama.image

Oh my god, i hate sluts! image

Other girls my age like to drink and party but i like to stay inside and read or watch netflix! I’m so weird. image

All the girls in my school care about is makeup and shopping and all i care about is FOOD and VIDEO GAMES. lol sometimes i think i was born a guy.image

This is everything.

tlichoonlinestore:

DVD - Tłı̨chǫ Oral Story (the story of the Woman Who Came Back) into a short animated film in Tłı̨chǫ or English. Available here ->
http://onlinestore.tlicho.ca/products/woman-who-came-back-dvd

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger
Dated: early 17th century
Culture: Mughal, Indian
Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm
This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.
These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.
The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

Khanjar Dagger

  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Culture: Mughal, Indian
  • Medium : rock crystal, gold, ruby, emerald, diamond, textiles
  • Measurements: 17.3 x 5.4 x 1.2 cm

This is an early seventeenth century Mughal dagger with a rock crystal hilt inlaid with rubies in a gold tracery design. The weapon is presented in a later sheath with gold mounts. This dagger was recorded in the North Corridor Inventory of Windsor Castle circa 1870 as no 803 a ‘Nepalese’ dagger and later noted in the collection of King Edward VII in the early 20th century.

These ear daggers can be seen in Mughal miniature paintings from the reign of the Emperor Jahangir, notably the well known painting attributed to 1618 in the Freer Gallery, Washington D.C., of an imaginary encounter between the Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Persian Shah Abbas, where the Emperor and his cup bearer both wear them. A number of these daggers with straight quillons in Persian style survive.

The rock crystal hilt of this khanjar, much like the wine cup in the al-Sabah Collection, was probably made by Persian craftsmen working in the Imperial Mughal workshop.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

In order to acquaint himself with his three lead actors, director Alfonso Cuarón had each of them write an essay about their characters, from a first-person point of view. Emma Watson wrote a 10-page essay. Daniel Radcliffe wrote a one-page summary, and Rupert Grint never even turned his in. (x)

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

The original hawk used to play Mordecai was kidnapped during shooting and held for ransom - production could not wait for him to be returned which is the reason that the bird that appears later in the movie has “more white feathers” - it’s a different bird. (x)

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!
maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!
maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!
maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!
maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!
maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!

maggiejneko:

…all around the city in black and white…and a little color at the end!

Hhhmmm, might need this.

  1. Camera: LG Electronics, Inc. LG-LG290C
art-of-swords:

Sword and Scabbard
Dated: circa 1750 - 1850
Culture: Bhutanese
Medium: steel, silver, gold, copper alloy, wood
Dimensions: overall length 34 inches (86.4 cm); blade length 26 1/8 inches (66.4 cm)

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

art-of-swords:

Sword and Scabbard
Dated: circa 1750 - 1850
Culture: Bhutanese
Medium: steel, silver, gold, copper alloy, wood
Dimensions: overall length 34 inches (86.4 cm); blade length 26 1/8 inches (66.4 cm)

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

art-of-swords:

Sword and Scabbard
Dated: circa 1750 - 1850
Culture: Bhutanese
Medium: steel, silver, gold, copper alloy, wood
Dimensions: overall length 34 inches (86.4 cm); blade length 26 1/8 inches (66.4 cm)

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

art-of-swords:

Sword and Scabbard
Dated: circa 1750 - 1850
Culture: Bhutanese
Medium: steel, silver, gold, copper alloy, wood
Dimensions: overall length 34 inches (86.4 cm); blade length 26 1/8 inches (66.4 cm)

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

art-of-swords:

Sword and Scabbard
Dated: circa 1750 - 1850
Culture: Bhutanese
Medium: steel, silver, gold, copper alloy, wood
Dimensions: overall length 34 inches (86.4 cm); blade length 26 1/8 inches (66.4 cm)

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

art-of-swords:

Sword and Scabbard

  • Dated: circa 1750 - 1850
  • Culture: Bhutanese
  • Medium: steel, silver, gold, copper alloy, wood
  • Dimensions: overall length 34 inches (86.4 cm); blade length 26 1/8 inches (66.4 cm)

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

kevinbolk:

the-last-teabender:

kevinbolk:

"ARTIST BOLDLY REIMAGINES DISNEY PRINCESS AS A PILE OF ROCKS" 

You’ve never seen them like this before. Mind blown!

Is it sad that I really kind of like it when K-Bo is 150% done with an art trend?

Hey, I was simply mining for things that haven’t been done with these characters and left no stone unturned. ;P